City Farmhouse Pop-up Fair

May 29, 2016 in Editorials

city farmhouseFor the past three years, the City Farmhouse Pop-up Fair has attracted visitors from across the globe to Middle Tennessee to score antique and vintage goods from dozens of curated vendors. Kim and David Leggett, owners of the downtown Franklin antiques shop from where the event derives its name, revealed that the summer fair will host the Sheryl Crow Repurposed Quilt For Charity Project for the first time. This will be in addition to an array of vendors from 21 states at The Factory at Franklin, June 17-18.

We want shoppers to experience something unexpected at our shows, especially since people travel from all over the world to attend them,” Kim Leggett said. “When you go to one of our pop-ups, you’ll see it’s like a small community of friends who share a passion for old pieces that tell a story, and Sheryl has become a part of that.”

A long-time shopper at City Farmhouse, the Nashville-based celebrity and Grammy-winning artist will once again contribute to the vintage market. She successfully brought in $20,000 for a non-profit organization close to her heart at the 2015 holiday pop-up by selling a range of goods from her personal collection.

For the June show, Crow is donating three of her own antique cutter quilts to be repurposed into individual pieces of art by a selection of creatives who applied for the challenge and were chosen by Leggett based on previous works and artistic ability. Robelyn Dorman of Waco, Texas, Darrell Ezekiel of Birmingham, Ala., and Laura Locke of Covington, Tenn., will transform the quilts into a collection of bags, a piece of wall art and an upholstered antique settee, respectively. Each piece will be auctioned off at the pop-up fair to benefit Syrian refugees.

We are so thankful to Sheryl for jumping in for a good cause, and I know these creatives are going to come up with some amazing pieces” Leggett said. “It’s crazy how popular last year’s fairs were and we received an overwhelming amount of positive feedback, but we’re expecting the June pop-up to be our best one to date.”

The 2015 City Farmhouse events drew nearly 20,000 shoppers to Williamson County from as far as Australia, California, New York and everywhere in between. The pop-ups have gained a reputation for their festival-like atmosphere, using live music and an array of local food trucks to complement the booths filled with handpicked selections spanning all eras and styles: farmhouse, French, architectural, garden, lighting, industrial, Americana and much more.

Farmhouse style is one of the fastest growing trends in interior design today. More than ever, homeowners and brides are looking for vintage and repurposed goods to decorate their homes and events,” Leggett said. “The show gives shoppers an opportunity to pick through finds from all over the country, and the interactive showcase will inspire festival-goers on how to creatively style their finds in their own spaces.”

Those who want to have a first look at the goods should attend the preview party that will kick off the market on Friday, June 17 from 4 to 8 p.m., allowing ticket holders to sip ‘n shop the show while listening to a live performance from the Jordan Carter Band and enjoying complimentary wine, beer and snacks.

On Saturday, June 18 from 8 to 6, the fun will continue as the remaining shoppers will pay $12 to browse the hand-selected vendors’ booths, full of antique goods, vintage wares and a range of timely gift items. Both days of the event will take place at Jameson and Liberty Halls inside The Factory at Franklin, a former warehouse that is also home to City Farmhouse’s popular brick-and-mortar store, located on Franklin Road and just a mile from the city’s historic downtown district.

The $40 tickets to the June 17 early-buying preview party are available online at www.eventbee.com, and Saturday shoppers can purchase their passes at the door. To learn more about City Farmhouse and June Pop-up Fair details, go to www.cityfarmhousefranklin.com.